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Category Archives: Police Procedure

Forensics For Dummies, 2nd Edition Coming Soon

 

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Just got the new cover for Forensics For Dummies, 2nd Edition.

It will be released from Wiley on 2-29-16

Pre-Order now

 

Crime and Science Radio: Tracking Down the Bad Guys: A Conversation with Retired US Marshal and Novelist Marc Cameron

Join Jan Burke and me as we welcome retire US Marshal Marc Cameron and discuss how the Marshals track down the bad guys—from Texas to Alaska. It’s a great show. Don’t miss it.

BIO: Marc Cameron is a retired Chief Deputy US Marshal and 29-year law enforcement veteran. His short stories have appeared in BOYS’ LIFE Magazine and the Saturday Evening Post. He’s published eleven novels, six of them Westerns.

BRUTE FORCE, sixth in his USA Today Bestselling Jericho Quinn Thriller series, is available December 2016 from Kensington. A second degree black belt in Ju Jitsu, Marc teaches defensive tactics to law enforcement agencies and civilian groups.

He lives in Alaska with his beautiful bride and BMW motorcycle.

 

Alaska Tracking Unit

 

Tracking in AZ

LISTENhttp://www.blogtalkradio.com/suspensemagazine/2016/01/16/crime-and-science-radio-with-special-guest-marc-cameron

LINKS:

Marc Cameroon Website: http://www.marccameronbooks.com

Marc Cameron on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarcCameronAuthor

Marc Cameron Blog: http://www.marccameronbooks.com/blog.htm

US Marshals Service: http://www.usmarshals.gov

 

Brute Force

 

Day Zero

 

Sisters in Crime Forensics Day Coming 1-24-16

Join Dennis Palumbo, David Putnam, and me for the Orange County Chapter of Sisters in Crime’s annual Forensics Day. It’ll be a fun afternoon as we dig into what makes the bad guys (and gals) do what they do.

Details:

Orange County Sisters in Crime Forensics Day
Dennis Palumbo, David Putnam, and DP Lyle
“What Makes Your Bad Guys Tick? Dark Motivations and Heinous Acts
Sunday, January 24th, 2016, 2:00 p.m.
Irvine Ranch Water District Community Room
15500 Sand Canyon Avenue
Irvine, CA 92618

ocsistersincrime.org

 

Forensics Fest 16 flyer

 

A Conversation with Best-selling Author Peter James

James

My friend Peter James is a great writer and anyone who has read his work knows this is true. If you haven’t had the pleasure, do so now. He might not be James Bond but he’s close. As is his wonderful character Roy Grace. His latest, YOU ARE DEAD, is a runaway success and he dropped by to chat about it and other writerly things.

Tell us about YOU ARE DEAD–the eleventh novel in the Detective Superintendent Roy Grace series. Does it pick up exactly where WANT YOU DEAD left off? 

Sure! You Are Dead is my 11th Roy Grace novel. A young Brighton woman arriving home from work phones her boyfriend, to tell him she has just driven into their underground car park and can see a man acting strangely. Her boyfriend tells her to drive straight back out but before he finishes speaking she screams and the phone goes dead. He calls the police and rushes home himself – and she has vanished.

That same afternoon, workmen digging up a park in another part of the city, unearth the remains of a woman in her early twenties, who has been dead for thirty years. At first, to Roy Grace and his team, these two events seem totally unconnected. But then another young woman in Brighton goes missing – and yet another body from the past surfaces. Detective Superintendent Roy Grace has the chilling realization that there is a connection between the past and the present. Does Brighton have its first serial killer in over eighty years? A monster who has resurfaced after lying low for three decades?

 

You Are Dead cover

 

Where do you draw inspiration from?

Aside from my imagination and own experiences, I regularly spend time out with the police and gain a huge amount of inspiration from things I see over and hear over that time.  Today I spend an average one day a week with the Police, either in a patrol car, or an office, or at a crime scene, or on a raid, or with their Intelligence or forensic or search units – there are so many different parts to their work.  I even have my own police car in Brighton!  My publishers donated it to Sussex Police and it drives around with my name all over it. I often get inspiration from things the police tell me, or cases that officers are involved with.  I believe to portray them credibly I need to be to a considerable extent involved in their lives, not just at work but when they are off duty.   Many police officers only socialize with others in the police too – they feel more comfortable that way.  They don’t have to worry about giving away secrets to a prying member of the public, or saying something offensive that might come back to bite them.  But I also think one of the best resources for my inspiration is in shops all over every town and city in the land, and refreshed daily – newspapers!  They contain so much of human life, and so many true crime stories.  In particular, I often think that local provincial papers contain more in-depth coverage and lurid details than the nationals.

Did you balance reading and writing? Have you read anything good lately? 

I try to ensure that whatever I’m doing I leave myself time to write 1000 words 6 days a week. I have offices in my Sussex and Notting Hill homes, but I can write anywhere. Thanks to laptops, my office has long ceased to be a concrete space and I can write on the move. I actually write really well on airplanes, in the back of a car and in hotel rooms. But my favourite writing time is 6 – 9:30 in the evening. I got used to that when I was working full time in film and TV, and made this my ‘me’ time. I have a stiff drink – often a vodka martini, with four olives, put on music and get in a zone. I really love this time of the day.

I recently really enjoyed I LET YOU GO by Claire Macintosh. I was first sent it as a proof, asking for a quote, and I was utterly gripped.  It is wonderfully written, with credible and interesting characters, and has one of the most astonishing twists I’ve ever read, turning the story completely on hits head halfway through.  It was one of those rare books I put down thinking, “Gosh, wish I’d written this!

Also recently I have been reading Patricia Highsmith, a very recent discovery for me. I have seen Strangers On A Train and The Talented Mr Ripley, but had never read her novels.  She is such a brilliant writer.

Who is a character you wished you created? 

Hannibal Lecter – I think he is one of the most interesting villains in all of crime fiction, a character that in many ways changed the face of modern mystery writing. Before Hannibal Lecter we had good versus evil, with Hannibal Lecter we saw, for the first time, bad versus evil.

Are you a fan of crime television shows? If so, which ones? 

I guess my favourite one of recent is Breaking Bad – if my time ever allows me to finish it! I have always loved them going back into my youth – I have a particular fondness for American shows. The first one I can remember being addicted to was called ‘Highway Patrol’ with Broderick Crawford.

Peter’s Website: http://www.peterjames.com

 
1 Comment

Posted by on December 15, 2015 in Police Procedure, Writing

 

Crime and Science Radio: Lie Catchers: Paul Bishop Returns

Join Jan Burke and me on Saturday 11-7-15 at 10 a.m. as we welcome back Paul Bishop for a discussion of police procedures and interrogations. It’ll be a fun hour.

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BIO: A thirty-five year veteran of the Los Angeles Police Department, Paul Bishop’s career has included a three year tour with his department’s Anti-Terrorist Division and over twenty-five years’ experience in the investigation of sex crimes. His Special Assaults Units regularly produced the highest number of detective initiated arrests and highest crime clearance rates in the city. Twice honored as Detective of the Year, Paul also received the Quality and Productivity Commission Award from the City of Los Angeles.

As a nationally recognized interrogator, Paul starred as the lead interrogator and driving force behind the ABC TV reality show Take The Money And Run from producer Jerry Bruckheimer.  Based on his expertise in deception detection, he currently conducts interrogation seminars for law enforcement, military, and human resource organizations.

Paul has published twelve novels, including five in his L.A.P.D. Detective Fey Croaker series.  He has also written numerous scripts for episodic television and feature films. He currently writes and edits the Fight Card series of hardboiled boxing novels under the pseudonym Jack Tunney. His newest book, written as Paul Bishop, is Lie Catchers — the first in a new series about LAPD interrogators Ray Pagan and “Calamity” Jane Randall.

LISTENhttp://www.blogtalkradio.com/suspensemagazine/2015/11/07/crime-and-science-radio-with-special-guest-paul-bishop

LINKS:

Paul Bishop’s Website: www.paulbishopbooks.com

The Fight Card Books Website: www.fightcardbooks.com

Paul’s books on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/PBonAmazon

Paul Bishop on Twitter: Twitter @bishsbeat

Paul Bishop on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Bishsbeat

Paul Bishop’s Blog on The Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-bishop/

Paul Bishop’s article, “The Crisis in Law Enforcement, Part I,” on The Huffington Post  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-bishop/the-crisis-in-law-enforce_b_8080272.html

 

Working with the FBI: A Brief Guide for Writers

Jan Burke and I recently had the FBI on Crime and Science Radio for a 2 part interview. It was outstanding. If you missed it, the shows are archived so go here to listen:

http://www.dplylemd.com/crime–science-radio-past.html

Crime writers are always looking for experts to chat with about their plots. The FBI offers just such access.

Need info on the FBI for your next story? Not sure how to approach them. Here’s how:

                                                 WORKING WITH THE FBI: A Brief Guide for Writers

If you are a writer who wants to feature the FBI in a TV, film, and literary project, the FBI may be able to work with you to create an accurate portrayal of the Bureau’s work.

The FBI’s Investigative Publicity and Public Affairs Unit (IPPAU) in the Bureau’s DC-based Office of Public Affairs works with screenwriters, producers, authors, and other industry personnel associated with TV programs, documentaries, made-for-TV movies, films, and books.

What the FBI needs from you:

Company name, point of contact, address, email, and phone number

Project status, i.e., sold, green-lit, commissioned, or speculative

Scope of FBI’s importance in the script

Overview of FBI characters and actions

Copy of the script or treatment

Project status and/or production schedule

Specificity regarding cases, procedures, or information needed

A list of FBI personnel desired for interviews and/or background meeting(s)

What the FBI can consider providing you:

Guidance on content and/or dialogue regarding FBI investigations, procedures, interagency coordination, structure, and history

Information on costumes, props, scenery, or weapons

Fact-checking

Liaison and coordination with local FBI field offices for interviews or B-roll footage

Coordination of visits to FBI headquarters and other facilities

Background briefings

For project assistance, please send your written proposal with above info to: public.affairs@ic.fbi.gov.  For further questions, please contact the FBI National Headquarters, Office of Public Affairs, Investigative Publicity and Public Affairs Unit at: 202-324-5348.

Please note that IPPAU considers and/or approves project assistance on a case-by-case basis. The FBI’s unit has limited resources and cannot assure cooperation or offer reviews or critiques of submitted projects/proposal. Please allow ample time for approval/clearance process.

 

Stupid Criminals: Man Attempts to Gnaw Off His Fingerprints

Damaged Print

If you have a record or an outstanding warrant or two, you might not want the police to ID you when you’re arrested for driving a stolen vehicle. I truly hate days like that. But, what to do? Maybe just gnaw off your fingerprints and they won’t be able to determine your ID. Probably painful, and probably won’t work. It looks like Kenzo Roberts gave it a whirl (no pun intended) anyway.

And he’s not alone. Many folks have tried to alter their fingerprints with cuts, burns, scrapes, and other painful procedures. Even Public Enemy #1 John Dillinger tried. Besides having plastic surgery to alter his face, he also attempted to burn away his fingerprints with acid. That didn’t work either.

John Dillinger

John Dillinger

FROM HOWDUNNIT:FORENSICS

FORENSIC CASE FILES: JOHN DILLINGER

John Dillinger was one of America’s most notorious criminals, once named Public Enemy No. 1. In an effort to evade the cops, he underwent facial plastic surgery and tried to remove his fingerprints with acid. After his betrayal by the famous “Lady in Red,” Dillinger was shot dead outside Chicago’s Biograph Theater. Prints taken at the morgue proved that the dead man was indeed Dillinger. The acid had damaged only a portion of his finger pads, leaving enough ridge detail for matching with his prints on file with the police.

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