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Honey and “Super Bugs”

08 Jan

Bees-1-atroszko-sxc

Here’s a first aid tip——if you find yourself out in the boondocks and suffer an injury and help is far away, clean the wound as best you can and find a beehive. Yes, a beehive. It just might save your life.

Honey applied to open wounds lessens the chance of infection. This has been empirically known for a couple of millennia. Hopefully you’ll never have to test this treatment method, but if so it just might help.

But can honey’s unique antibacterial properties be useful in treating the new antibiotic-resistant “super bugs” that seem to appear with increasing frequency? The answer is a definite maybe.

Check out these articles:

ACS: http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2014/march/honey-is-a-new-approach-to-fighting-antibiotic-resistance-how-sweet-it-is.html

NIH, NLM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3609166/

 
6 Comments

Posted by on January 8, 2015 in Medical Issues

 

6 responses to “Honey and “Super Bugs”

  1. Suzanne Joshi

    January 8, 2015 at 2:56 pm

    I read about this some time back. Also, termeric will kill germs. It’s put on bandaids here in India.

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  2. Brenda

    January 8, 2015 at 3:05 pm

    Soooooo, do you keep honey in your First Aid kit? And what do you have in your First Aid kit in your car or backpack? (And what can those of us who aren’t M.D.’s put in ours?)

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    • D.P. Lyle, MD

      January 8, 2015 at 3:49 pm

      No honey but bandages, tape, antiseptic cleaner, that sort of thing. But the best first aid device is a working cell phone.

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  3. Gloria Getman

    January 8, 2015 at 3:45 pm

    Beekeepers knew it all along. Do not use store bought honey that might be mixed with corn syrup. Be sure to use pure honey. Pure honey in a jar can sit on a shelf for 20 yrs. and not grow a speck of bacteria. It darkens, but is still good.

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  4. eleanorsullivan

    January 9, 2015 at 10:20 am

    Glad to know this. I write mysteries featuring the village midwife/healer in an actual town in 1830 Ohio. The good news? They kept bees! Can’t wait to feature this in my next book. Thanks, Doug!

    Like

     
  5. chitrader

    January 9, 2015 at 2:33 pm

    Interesting to know. Thanks, Doc.

    Like

     

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