RSS

PTSD: Blame Your Hippocampus/Amygdala Complex

17 May

3.Limbic-System-1

PTSD is an increasingly common psychiatric condition that has many origins and manifestations. As with most psychiatric conditions there has been a long of history of scientists searching for some physical explanation, or at least an underlying substrate for these conditions. Everything from schizophrenia to criminal behavior has been studied. PTSD is no different.

Now a new study from Duke University, published in the Archives of General Psychiatry last November, sheds new light on possible anatomical changes in those susceptible to developing PTSD. This alteration lies deep in the brain in the hippocampus/amygdala complex, which is part of the larger Limbic System, areas of the brain associated with emotions, stress responses, learning, memory, socialization, and many other things. The researchers studied 200 combat veterans and found that PTSD sufferers tended to have smaller amygdalar and hippocampal volumes as compared to “normal” subjects.

Does this mean we now have a test for determining who is vulnerable to developing PTSD? Not yet. But this study is a step in that direction.

My first Dub Walker thriller, STRESS FRACTURE, dealt with PTSD and its treatment.

 

Stress Fx cover

 
 

7 responses to “PTSD: Blame Your Hippocampus/Amygdala Complex

  1. Leon Vickman, author

    May 17, 2013 at 11:05 am

    Another fascinating article (PTSD)!

    Leon Vickman, author.

    Like

     
  2. Cheryl B. Dale

    May 17, 2013 at 1:27 pm

    Would ‘like’ but I’m not a WordPress member!

    Like

     
  3. Allison Brennan

    May 17, 2013 at 2:02 pm

    I used the amygdala in my supernatural thriller — it’s the portion of the brain that’s affected when someone is touched by a one of the demonic seven deadly sins … and then they act on their deep-seated “sin” (envy, wrath, etc) before they die. I may have even consulted you about this three, four years ago …😉

    Like

     
  4. Mysti Berry

    May 18, 2013 at 9:01 am

    Thanks for this! Someone very close to me has serious PTSD issues, and it helps him to know the physical origins. Looking forward to reading this book!

    Like

     
    • D.P. Lyle, MD

      May 18, 2013 at 9:06 am

      Hopefully this helps. And I hope you enjoy STRESS FRACTURE.

      Like

       
  5. sifs india

    June 11, 2013 at 4:41 am

    Thanks for this! Someone very close to me has serious PTSD issues, and it helps him to know the physical origins. Looking forward to reading this book!

    Like

     
  6. Sarah Evans

    June 14, 2013 at 1:08 pm

    I’m really excited to have found your blog (a friend pointed me here). I’m an aspiring writer and your blog posts appeal to me both on that level and on a personal one. It’s nice to meet you!

    Like

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: