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Author Archives: D.P. Lyle, MD

About D.P. Lyle, MD

Author, Lecturer, Story Consultant

Greed Can Be Dangerous: A 2800-year-old Case Solved?

Gold Bowl

 

How did a valuable gold bowl and three skeletons end up at the bottom of a refuse shaft in the ancient Iranian citadel of Hasanlu? It just might have been a building collapse that did in the unlucky thieves. Interesting historical forensics.

New Scientist: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26129-iron-age-csi-finds-gold-thieves-died-in-the-act.html?full=true&print=true#.VAS4ekuaGzA

Ancient Origins: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-general/dark-tale-behind-golden-bowl-hasanlu-002054

 

Remains of the citadel of Hasanlu

Remains of the citadel of Hasanlu

 

Fingerprinting Bullets: A New Forensic Science Technique

Bullets recovered from crime scenes or bodies can tell investigators a great deal: the caliber of the weapon can be determined by measuring and/or weighing the bullet; the marks left on the bullet’s surface by the lands and grooves and twists of the barrel can reveal the manufacturer; and these same striations can be used to match the bullet to a particular suspect weapon. These striations area the most individualizing and therefore the most useful in criminal investigations involving forearms.

But what if the bullet is too damaged for such comparisons? All is not lost. An analysis of the chemical make up of the bullet might reveal not only the manufacturer but also the batch from which it came. This might serve to narrow the location of purchase and ultimately lead to the perpetrator..

Bullet Fingerprints To Help Solve Crimes: http://phys.org/news/2014-07-bullet-fingerprints-crimes.html

 

Murder By Meme: Slender Man and the Wakefield Anti-Vaccine Hoax

Slender Man

We all know that viral illnesses can kill. Ebola would be an example. So would small pox and the 1918 Flu.

But can an internet viral hoax kill? An interesting article titled “Murder By Meme: Slender Man and the Wakefield Anti-Vax Hoax” by Travis Langley, Ph.D. in Psychology Today looks at this issue.

In June, 2009, Eric Knudsen (aka Victor Surge) posted a pair of black & white photos of groups of children in which he had inserted a thin figure in a black suit into the background. This was the birth of the Slender Man hysteria. It led to the attempted murder of a 12-year-old girl by two of her classmates, also 12. Why would they stab their classmate 19 times? Apparently to serve as “proxies” for The Slender Man and to show that he really existed.

Crazy is as crazy does.

And then there’s the 14-year-old who read about Slender Man and decided she needed to burn down her home—-with her mother and brother inside. Fortunately there were no injuries but the house and family car took a hit.

But such internet hoaxes aren’t confined to the world on teen angst. It has also entered the world of legitimate medicine. And has done great harm.

MMR

Ever seen a case of Whooping Cough? Diphtheria? Probably not. I’ve never seen diphtheria and whooping cough (pertussis) only a couple of times way back during my pediatrics rotation as a junior medical student. The reason these and other childhood diseases such a rubella and mumps are now not so common is a robust and widespread immunization program that has done a stellar job in keeping these illnesses at bay.

Enter Dr. Andrew Wakefield. He apparently created an entirely fraudulent research study that suggested that the MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine caused Autism. Based on this scam, allegedly funded by an “ambulance-chasing” law firm, many well-meaning and fearful parents refused to vaccinate their children. This led to outbreaks of these uncommon diseases. Here in my own backyard, Orange County, CA, we had an outbreak of pertussis that could be traced for the most part to a single pediatrician who bought into this “bad science.”

The truth? There is not a single piece of legitimate evidence to suggest that MMR is in any way related to autism.

And Slender Man does not exist.

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2014 in Medical History, Medical Issues

 

ORIGINAL SIN Review

OS 200X300

A good review of ORIGINAL SIN by Jon Land in the Providence Journal:

Dr. Doug Lyle puts his medical and forensics training to excellent use in the stellar“Original Sin” (Reputation Books, 238 pages, $19.95) that reads like Robin Cook’s “Coma” on steroids. Lyle treats us to not one, but two terrific heroines in Dr. Lucy Wagner and her friend, as well as ours, ex-cop Samantha Cody. It’s a classic riches-to-rags tale that starts when the famously successful Wagner loses a patient and then nearly everything else. Enter ex-boxer Cody. Never one to shy away from a fight, she encounters more than her share of opponents in trying to get to the bottom of a conspiracy at the hands of those who are about to learn to take a punch. Lyle adroitly balances spot-on medical science and technology with adroit plotting and masterful characters. A mix of Michael Crichton and C. J. Box that adds up to seasoned and savory brain candy.

This and other excellent reviews: http://www.providencejournal.com/features/entertainment/books/20141005-thrillers-novels-that-range-from-old-fashioned-to-cutting-edge-cliffhangers.ece

More Info on ORIGINAL SIN: http://www.dplylemd.com/DPLyleMD/Books-SCody.html

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2014 in Book Review, Writing

 

Book Review: Full Measure by T. Jefferson Parker

Full Measure

FULL MEASURE is now available and is excellent.

T. Jefferson Parker has won three Edgar Awards for a reason—he’s a great writer. With FULL MEASURE, he steps away from more traditional crime fiction and into the mainstream literary genre. The result is this wonderful book. Want to know what a character-driven story feels like? Read FULL MEASURE. Characters that will linger with you for a long time. Highly recommended.

http://www.tjeffersonparker.com

 
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Posted by on October 10, 2014 in Book Review, Writing

 

Crime and Science Radio: Inside The Creative Mind: An Interview With Psychotherapist, Screenwriter, and Novelist Dennis Palumbo

Join Jan Burke and DP Lyle on Saturday 10-18-14 at 10 a.m. Pacific as they discuss psychology and storytelling in both novels and on the screen with veteran screenwriter/novelists Dennis Palumbo

DPalumbo

BIO: Formerly a Hollywood screenwriter (My Favorite Year; Welcome Back, Kotter, etc.), Dennis Palumbo is now a licensed psychotherapist and author of Writing From the Inside Out (John Wiley). His work helping writers has been profiled in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, GQ and other publications, as well as on CNN, NPR and PBS. He also blogs regularly for The Huffington Post and Psychology Today.

His mystery fiction has appeared in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, The Strand and elsewhere, and is collected in From Crime to Crime (Tallfellow Press). His acclaimed series of crime novels (Mirror Image, Fever Dream, Night Terrors and the upcoming Phantom Limb) feature psychologist Daniel Rinaldi, a trauma expert who consults with the Pittsburgh Police.  All are from Poisoned Pen Press.

LISTENhttp://www.blogtalkradio.com/suspensemagazine/2014/09/30/crime-and-science-radio-with-special-guest-dennis-palumbo

LINKS:

Website: http://dennispalumbo.com

YOU SEE DEAD PEOPLE? BIG DEAL. JOIN THE CLUB: http://dennispalumbo.com/articles-dennis-palumbo/you-see-dead-people/

Taking The Mystery Out Of Writing Mysteries: http://dennispalumbo.com/take-the-mystery-out-of-writing/

Is Your Psycho Killer Just . . . Psycho?: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dennis-palumbo/writing-tips-for-mystery-books_b_1450589.html

From Spec Script to the Big Screen—It Can Happen To You!: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dennis-palumbo/from-spec-script-to-the-b_b_4881332.html

Who (And What) Defines Normal?: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dennis-palumbo/definition-of-normal_b_1149362.html

Hollywood On The Couch: Going the Distance: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dennis-palumbo/hollywood-on-the-couch-go_b_779917.html

Through A Glass Darkly: Crime Fiction as a Window on American Culture: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dennis-palumbo/through-a-glass-darkly-cr_b_494065.html

BOOKS:

NightTerrorsfrontforaupromo copy

http://www.poisonedpenpress.com/night-terrors/

http://www.amazon.com/Night-Terrors-Daniel-Rinaldi-Mystery/dp/1464201315

PhantomLimbcover copy

http://www.poisonedpenpress.com/phantom-limb/

http://www.amazon.com/Phantom-Limb-Daniel-Rinaldi-Mystery/dp/1464202567

 

Guest Blogger: Lisa Black: Scambaiting

scam money tree

The email showed up in my Inbox one morning with the subject line: I have a genuine proposal of great benefit to you. 

Yeah, that sounds totally genuine.

And thus I entered the exciting and dangerous world of scambaiting. Except it’s more tedious than exciting, and not too dangerous when the perpetrators sit on the other side of the planet and can’t afford air fare.

I hate scammers. I hate Rachael from Credit Card Services who calls twice a day (though sometimes she’s Bridget, and sometime Scott, and once in a while she’s Carmen) trying to get me to hand over my credit card numbers. I hate the emails that tell me I won a lottery I never entered in a country I’ve never been to. I am just waiting for some kid to call me pretending to be a grandson I don’t have, asking for bail money to get out of some totally bogus charge in Greece. And the fake Microsoft people are still trying to convince me that my computer is sending out error messages.

So I declared war.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the Do Not Call lists, state or federal, do nothing. I continue to report each and every call to them in the hopes of making any charges they do someday press just that tiny bit more massive. The email scammers are almost always outside our borders, sending false phone numbers to your caller ID, and no one has time to track them down. Therefore, all you can do to strike a glancing blow for Cosmic Justice is: Waste their time. Every minute they spend sending you an email or sitting on the phone writing down fictitious credit card numbers is a minute they can’t spend scamming some poor soul who might actually fall for it.

scam person on phone

There are entire websites dedicated to people’s efforts to derail these scammers, and they are a font of good information and some great laughs. Following their advice I set up a new, free email account and instantly became Chloe, a pretty twenty-two year old, complete with a fetching photo from MS Office Clipart. (This wasn’t just wishful thinking—I thought her youth might explain her apparent naiveté in believing every story sent to her.) Chloe lives in a state I’ve never been to and works hard as a waitress at a Waffle House. I borrowed the phone number of Rachael from Credit Card Services, using the town it comes back to in a reverse lookup search—it doesn’t matter, since scammers won’t pay the long distance phone bill to actually call it. I invented a non-existent address on a real road with a real zip code.

scam you have mail

Then I started writing back. I copied the body only of the emails that came to my legitimate email address and responded—they send out too many at a time to notice one coming back from an address they didn’t contact. I told Ms. Liza Wong from Malaysia that I would be happy to help distribute the dead philanthropist’s money to those less fortunate, and MegaMillions winner Jim McCullen that I would accept the responsibility of disbursing his winnings. I wrote back to a helpful FBI agent in New York (though his IP address said Madagascar) who had found a package of 4.1 million dollars with my name on it (literally) and just needed me to fill out some forms to complete delivery. I found this so helpful of him. Who says the federal government is suspicious and obstructive and overly concerned with things like income tax payments?

A co-worker of mine drew the short straw and thus has been trained in the art of downloading computers to find stashes of child porn and other crimes. She has become my go-to person with tentative questions about How This Stuff Actually Works. Unfortunately whenever I ask her something she tends to burst into Swahili, throwing around terms like ‘data dump’ and ‘NTFS access’. I asked her about the IP addresses for the three emails above (the scambaiters’ site taught me how to find those), since the first two said they were in other countries but their IPs came back to the US and Canada. She said they can route through other people’s IPs. I always believed McGee on NCIS tracing an email that bounces through IPs all over the world to be Hollywood hyperbole, but it turns out to be somewhat accurate. My co-worker can’t do it, perhaps because my city can’t afford the cool flat-screens, but it can certainly be done. But, she said, they would need the cooperation of the host IPs. Aha, I said. Unless they hacked them, she said. Oh, I sighed.

I GoogleEarthed (you know what I mean) my three IPs and found that the US one sat on the edge of a closed Air Force base (yikes) and the other two bordered high schools. My co-worker said they were probably using the free wi-fi—the same reason you see cars in the Starbucks parking lot when the place isn’t even open.

scam check

Nothing all that exciting has happened yet. The FBI agent never wrote back about my box of cash. The other two put me in touch with their banker, who sent me a very professional looking email detailing how, since I live in neither England or Malaysia, I have to deposit a sum to open a ‘temporal account’ to which my large windfall can then be deposited. The UK bank wants $1200, and the Malaysian one a more reasonable $640. I pleaded poverty (it would take my 22-year-old months to save that from her Waffle House paychecks!) and put them in touch with my banker at my fictional savings & loan.  Chloe’s banker is an old family friend and looking out for the sweet girl’s interests, which is why he sent their bankers his own forms, which they must complete and return before they can be allowed to make a deposit at his fine institution. This will be difficult since the form demands to know things like your HBG number, which stands for “I Have No Idea, I Just Made It Up.” If they somehow work their way through this impossible task, then they may encounter further problems trying to fax it to another of Rachael from Card Services’ numbers.

Apparently both bankers found this daunting enough to give up on Miss Chloe, as neither she nor her bank manager have heard from them again. Jim McCullar gave up as well. Liza Wong hung in the longest with a forlorn, ‘have you heard from the bank, what’s going on?’ email.

I did have more success with today’s call from the persistent “Carmen” from “Credit Card Services.” They happened to call as I sat in front of my computer. Did you know you can Google “fake credit card number generator” and bring up a list of numbers for the major agencies? I kept a very polite representative on the phone for nearly fifteen minutes as she tried to ‘verify my balances’. I prepared to insist that, of course those are my correct credit card numbers, I’m looking right at them, but instead after a while she simply, quietly, failed to return from Hold.

But somewhere in the country, some other poor telephone owner got an extra ten minutes of peace this afternoon.

They’re welcome.

close to the bone 1

Close to the Bone hits forensic scientist Theresa MacLean where it hurts, bringing death and destruction to the one place where she should feel the most safe—the medical examiner’s office in Cleveland, Ohio, where she has worked for the past fifteen years of her life. Theresa returns in the wee hours after working a routine crime scene, only to find the body of one of her deskmen slowly cooling with the word “Confess” written in his blood. His partner is missing and presumed guilty, but Theresa isn’t so sure. The body count begins to rise but for once these victims aren’t strangers—they are Theresa’s friends and colleagues, and everyone in the building, herself included, has a place on the hit list.

Lisa photo

Lisa Black spent the five happiest years of her life in a morgue. As a forensic scientist in the Cleveland coroner’s office she analyzed gunshot residue on hands and clothing, hairs, fibers, paint, glass, DNA, blood and many other forms of trace evidence, as well as crime scenes. Now she’s a certified latent print examiner and CSI for the Cape Coral Police Department in Florida. Her books have been translated into six languages and one reached the NYT mass market bestseller’s list.

 
 
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